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Wet, Cold Bikepacking Weekend.

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A very sodden bikepacker.

It isn’t every day that you line up three consecutive days for bikepacking with your son, so when it happens – you take it, even if the weather calls for a very wet and cold start to the trip.

We have done the Elbow loop as a day trip, hiking trip and bikepacking trip a number of times now.  It was time to move on to something a little more challenging.  I cobbled together a potential route that had a large number of alternates in case of troubles.  I thought it was going to be a stretch, but might be possible.

Thursday evening we set out from the parking lot in moderate rain.  Tadhg wasn’t feeling his best and felt sluggish on the climbs, but was happy enough.  The rain wasn’t excessive, but there was a consistent drizzle.  We had planned to make Tombstone pass by sundown but ended up only halfway, near where the Romulus campground used to be before the ’13 floods.

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Watching the very camouflaged pheasant round up her chicks

As we set up the tent, the rain got serious.  Then it got worse.

By morning, the rain had tapered down to a steady shower.  Neither of us were in a big hurry to get out into it, so we stretched breakfast and coffee till nearly 11 and hit the trail around 11:30.  The plan was to get 45km further down a couple of trails before settling down for the night.

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Deep in a washout with a wet camera.
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Squishy trail.

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I often say that single digit temperatures and rain are much colder than temperatures below freezing and this was no exception.  We struggled with rain-softened trail and low energy.  Tadhg wasn’t hungry, which is usually a sure sign of trouble.

By 5pm, we had made it less than 20km and had crossed only the smallest passes – hardly worthy of their name.  We came to a river crossing and decided to look for a place to camp – conveniently, there was an old horse camp exactly where we were.

The rain let up as we were setting up camp and things started to look up.  I revised our route plan to remove the second half so as to avoid getting too far away from the car to be able to get back on Sunday.  We left the camp better than when we started by burning the garbage that had been left in the fire pit and surrounding area.

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Saturday morning started sunny and warm with about half a dozen river or creek crossings and then a major washout.  I scouted the trail and there was a clear way through, it was just going to take time.  If we had been able to estimate how much time, we would have continued.  I just didn’t think it was prudent to move away from the car down an unknown trail to possibly put us out of reach of our sunday evening deadline.  We thought about it for a while and even though we were both in a better mood and Tadhg had energy, we decided to turn back the way we had come and ride out the remainder of the Elbow loop as a very easy 2 days.

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Sun really improves the mood

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Though we were taking it easy, it was early when we got back to Tombstone campground.  We filtered water and ate a bunch of candy.  Then we met up with a couple of fatbikers out on a day trip.  We set out down the Big Elbow side of the trail knowing that the washouts would slow us down by quite a bit, and thinking we would ride for a couple of hours and then camp for the night.  The washouts weren’t as bad as we expected, and Tadhg was riding really well – easily clearing the many rock gardens and rough trail patches.  We took lots of breaks and stopped frequently to chat with the fatbikers, but we were running out of trail.

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As we started to set up camp, Tadhg pointed out the futility of camping less than an hour from our car and so we re-packed and hit the trail.  We rode full out on the last section, passing some unladen bikers on full suspension rigs (much to their dismay). We were home shortly.

Overall it was a very successful bikepack even though we got less than a third of the planned route completed.  This was the first time I had my Krampus with the suspension fork out for bikepacking and it was close to ideal.  The miserable weather at the beginning let me us have a taste for hardship, and was a great gear test.  By not forcing Tadhg to continue we managed to keep the ride fun and improve the chances of his coming back for another attempt.

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Minnewanka fatbikepacking microadventure.

“More food please.” We had been in the car for an hour and a half. He had eaten 2 pears, 2 oranges, an apple, a sandwich and a granola bar. We were popping in to get our camp permit anyway so I picked up a pair of masala dosas to go and we headed out of the Banff townsite with Tadhg stuffing his face.

After packing the bikes, we were on the trail by 3:30, our plan was to bike 11km along the Lake Minnewanka trail to the very originally named LM11 back country campsite (actually, it has a name, it is numbered to avoid confusion). The trail starts out with a bit of climbing, but most of it is rideable by Tadhg since he has been riding to school this year and is super fit.

The trail is not so snow covered that we need the fatbikes we are riding, but they aren’t totally overkill either. Tadhg has grown over the last couple of years so he now carries his own clothes and sleeping pad, as well as the 3 liters of gatorade that he loves so much.

Several snack stops down the trail, we come to the LM8 campsite. Though it is now twilight, we decide to press on, but not for long, as dark comes early this time of year. By LM9, it is full dark and we decide to camp. Unfortunately, we have neglected to bring a book, since dinner and food hanging is done by 6. After a bit of walking around, we decide to turn in around 7.

With the temperature forecast to only go as low as -9°C, I have no concern about the cold. I didn’t even bother to zip my sleeping bag, since using it spread like a quilt lets me move much more freely. Several times during the night I am awakened by the pitter patter of unwelcome little rodent feet as mice or voles seem pretty convinced that they will find food in our tent. Where are the owls and martens that we love so much?

Even our properly hung food bag does not escape attention as one of our granola bars is 90% eaten and another few have been opened and sampled by some sort of critter capable of robbing food from a bag suspended by a metal cable.

Since we now have the whole day to ride, we decide to head further away from the car. After 5 km and several snacks, we turn back. Tadhg’s riding continues to impress me, there are some rock gardens and technical sections that he would have been walking just this summer, but they are trivial to him now.

 

 

As we got to the LM8 campground, we realized that one od Tadhg’s mittens was missing from his bike. Though we rode back to look for it, we did not find it, but we did get some more riding done on this wonderful trail. We also ate more snacks.

This last picture is a movie, not just a boring picture:

Even with the one mitten lost, we did have a great overnight ride and both Tadhg and I called the trip a success.

The final stats ended up: day 1 – 9.5 km, day 2 – 27 km. The only climbing that seemed significant was the 100m gain at the car end of the trail.

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Chilcotins Gun Creek Lakes Tour Day 1

The kids and I got back recently from our trip to the Chilcotin mountains of BC.  We tricked my friend Vik into coming along and carrying some of our heavy food.  Our plan was to take from 5 to 7 days to make a loop up Gun Creek, over Deer Pass and down past Spruce Lake and back to our original parking spot.  Having kids along meant a lot of extra weight in gear and food since they eat similarly to and adult and sleep in a sleeping bag at night.

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Elbow Loop Bikepacking: Dad and Two Kids

Summer of 2012 was drawing to a close we wanted to get something of an adventure in before the summer ended.  So the two kids and I decided to go for a five day, four night bikepacking trip in the Elbow Valley.  Tadhg and I had done the Elbow Loop trail a number of times before and we both enjoyed it as well as Elbow Lake and so we decided to add an out and back trip through Elbow Pass to Elbow Lake to the main 42km loop.

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Our first day started early in the afternoon after a swimming party in the morning.  The first leg is an easy and relatively flat section of the trail to the Big Elbow campground.  We had the entire campground to ourselves.  The kids played an assortment of games involving sticks and rocks and after a relaxing supper, we got to bed relatively early.

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Winter Fatbikepacking With a 9 Year Old.

I have a passion for winter bike riding.  I love sleeping outdoors in the cold.  This year, my son finally reached a height where he can ride an extra small sized Salsa Mukluk comfortably.  It therefore made sense that we should go out together on a fatbikepacking weekend.

We started out from the car around noon on Friday March 1st, with our gear distributed as follows:

My bike:

  • Tent fly and footprint with poles
  • 2 Sleeping bags
  • Food
  • Stove
  • Clothes
  • Water

Tadhg’s bike:

  • 2 lightweight sleeping pads
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Just starting out.

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